Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000C15 32GB Review
Category : DDR4
Published by Marc Büchel on 18.08.17
With their Vengeance RGB modules Corsair has some seriously good looking DRAM modules on the market. The customer receives an RGB illumination, which in combination with the black heatspreader, looks rather compelling. Apart from that the specs are interesting as well and DDR4-3000 should add a little performance.



Manufacturer Corsair
Series Vengeance LED
Part Number CMR32GX4M4C3000C15
Type DDR4
Capacity 32 GB (4 x 8GB)
Frequency 3000 MHz
Timings 15-17-17-35
VDIMM 1.35 Volt
Registred/Unbuffered Unbuffered
ECC No
Cooling Passive Heatspreader
Waranty Lifetime warranty
Package Type Boxed


With the Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000C15 DDR4 kit, Corsair has memory modules in its portfolio, which due to the RGB lighting serve the high-end market but in the case of the frequencies it's a mid-range kit. DDR4-3000 with CL15-17-17-35 timings is currently a reasonable combination. Corsair is using custom labelled Hynix chips and our guess is that those are AFR ICs.



Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion
[pagebreak]

Closer Look

  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 Packaging
  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 Packaging
  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 Packaging


The new Vengeance modules from Corsair are being shipped in its own cardboard box. Apart from that they have been enclosed in blister packaging. 

  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 - Installed
  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 Packaging - Lighting
  • Corsair Vengeance LED 4x8GB DDR4-3000 - Lighting


The heatspeaders of the new Vengeance have a finish that's been kept in black entirely, which - apparently - makes them visually suitable almost any kind of build. Apart from that there is the RGB illumination, which allows for choosing any color you like. The heatspreaders on these modules have been nicely made, consisting of sheet aluminum thermal interface padding and the a transparent plastic bar for the red illumination.  



Taking the heatspeaders off Corsairs Vengeance series is not something we would recommend doing at home due to strong adhesive that requires a very careful approach. Once the heatspreaders have been removed we see that Corsair is putting Hynix ICs on these modules which received custom labeling. As we already mentioned we'd guess Corsair is making use of Hynix's AFR chips.

  • Corsair LINK Softare
  • Corsair LINK Software
  • Corsair LINK Software


The main feature of these Corsair Vengeance memory sticks is clearly the RGB lighting. To be perfectly honest with you I frist struggled a little bit making the colors change on these sticks. I had to figure out that I need to set "SPD Write" to "Enabled" in the BIOS so the Corsair LINK software can send the memory sticks the commands which allow for changing the colors. Once that's working you can either configure the DIMMs individually or grouped. In the case of the color selection you choose from the entire RGB spectrum. Apart from that there are also different modes like "Static", "Color Pulse", "Color Shift" and "Rainbow" pre-programmed. Once that little setting in the BIOS is done choosing different colors or effects is basically as simple and as straight forward as it gets. Apart from that the memory sticks glow evenly and rather bright in your system.

Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion
[pagebreak]

Photo Gallery


   


     



Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion
[pagebreak]

Test Setup

In order to thoroughly test memory as well as memory kits, we're making use of Intels Haswell-E platform in combination with a highly binned Core i7-6950X CPU. This allows use to drive memory at highest possible frequencies and therefore do proper scaling tests. Different memory chips (ICs) have different sweet spots in the case of primary timings, which is why we're altering CAS latency, tRCD, tRP as well as tRAS. Overall we build five different presets, which - as explained - can be different from IC to IC used on a memory module. Other than that we're also changing DRAM voltages, wheras we're setting 1.20V, 1.35V and 1.50V. There are actually reasons why we're using these voltages. 1.20V is the standard voltage for DDR4 memory. 1.35V on DDR4 is used in case of slight overclocking and with 1.50V you can push the module by quite a bit. Last but not least it remains to be explained how we find out whether a certain setting is stable or not. For that purpose we're running HyperPi.

Motherboard ASUS Rampage V Edition 10
CPU Intel Core i7-6950X
Graphic card ASUS GTX 980
Memory CMK16GX4M4A3200C16PK
SSD Samsung 845DC EVO 960GB
PSU Seasonic Platinum 660 Watts
OS Windows 10, 64 bit


Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion
[pagebreak]

Voltage/Latency scaling tests





Looking at the scaling curves with different latencies we see that only in the case of CL12 there is linear scaling showing big frequency increases when increasing the voltage. Testing the memory with CL13 as well as CL14 also shows that the memory responds positively to increased voltages. When looking at the CL13 curve the frequency bump between 1.35V and 1.5V is smaller than from 1.2V to 1.35V, which might already be an indicator for what we’re going to see with even higher latencies. Nevertheless CL14 is proving different, since in this case this kit scales best when changing the voltage from 1.35V to 1.5V. Arriving at the higher latencies we now see that testing CL15, CL16 and CL17 shows that voltages higher than 1.35V don’t have an effect on the frequency anymore.

Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion
[pagebreak]

Conclusion

General + -
Overall it can be said, that the Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000C15 32 Gigabyte memory kit does what Corsair claims they do and therefore they clear specs without an issue. Apart from that the Vengeance kits do have a reputation for being beautiful and the RGB LED lighting really adds to it. Making the RGB lighting work can be a little bit tricky in the first place, since you'll have to enter the BIOS and search for the parameter "SPD Write" and set it to enabled. Now Tools such as Corsair's LINK software can access the memory to change the color of the lighting.   - Compatibility with big coolers - RGB lighting  
 
Scaling   + -
The only latency set with which we've noticed linear scaling was CL12. If we look at CL13, CL14, CL15 as well as CL16 and CL17 we always see a degression when setting 1.5 volt, except for CL14. This means, that at 1.5 Volt you can drive these sticks close to their maximum frequency or worst case 1.5V don't show an effect over 1.35V.   - Scaling CL12  
 
Overclocking   + -
Using the Rampage V Edition 10 and our specific memory testing CPU, which has a good IMC, reaching 3.2GHz on the memory was actually easy. Unfortunately the journey stops quite soon at 3400 MHz. In this case we have to feed these sticks with 1.35 volt and it's running with latency set that is slightly altered from the stock settings being a little tighter.   - 3.4+ GHz
 
 
Recommendation / Price   + -
Checking Geizhals.at for prices we find the Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000C15 32 Gigabyte kit (CMU32GX4M4C3200C16R) listed for 299 Euro. Corsair is therefore continuing with their pricing scheme and these Vengeance modules are definitely no bargain. We would honeslty like to find these modules for a little less.     - Price
 
Rating
The Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000C15 (CMU32GX4M4C3200C16R) receives good 4 out of 5 stars.
 



Page 1 - Introduction
Page 2 - Closer Look
Page 3 - Photo Gallery
Page 4 - Test Setup
Page 5 - Voltage/Latency scaling tests
Page 6 - Conclusion